Elle Sez: Walking the Walk-CERT Work in Upland, California

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Elle Sez: Walking the Walk-CERT Work in Upland, California

We’ve all been hearing about the testing that’s been occurring in the United States. Well, it finally made to Upland. We had our first testing the day after Memorial day and 424 people, both drive-throughs with appointments and walk-ins with no appointments got tested. They used the throat swab method.

Everything worked very smoothly. We were only open from 10 in the morning till two in the afternoon so we were working pretty hard during that time. CERT was mostly involved in traffic control, there was no medical contact.
So here we are in our CERT uniforms at the Covid drive-through testing site. It was from ten until two and we saw about 600 people. We were the traffic control people so we were distanced from the cars and were in absolutely no danger.
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The ladies on the right side of the second photo that are under the pop-up our county employees. But their usual jobs are as librarians. They said there were “volu-told” to do this job if they wanted a paycheck.

This is a throat swab in the area.
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TSA Unveils New Security Procedures at Airports

TSA Unveils New Security Procedures at Airports

The nation is reopening from the coronavirus shutdown as Memorial Day and the summer travel season approach. If you head to the airport soon, be prepared to scan your own boarding pass and put carry-on food into plastic bags for inspection.
The Transportation Security Administration is updating security procedures at checkpoints in an attempt to reduce the potential for COVID-19 cross-contamination, the agency said in a news release. The changes should be in place at airports nationwide by mid-June, the agency said.

“In the interest of TSA frontline workers and traveler health, TSA is committed to making prudent changes to our screening processes to limit physical contact and increase physical distance as much as possible,” TSA administrator David Pekoske said in the news release. “We continue to evaluate our security measures with an eye towards making smart, timely decisions benefiting health and safety, as well as the traveler experience.”

Here are some of the main changes:

Travelers will scan their paper or electronic boarding pass themselves, instead of handing them to a TSA officer, then hold the boarding pass up for the officer to visually inspect.

  • Food items should be placed in clear plastic bags and put into bins for X-ray scanning.
  • Separating the food reduces the chances a TSA officer will need to open a bag, the TSA says.
  • The TSA encourages people to “pack smart.” If an officer thinks a prohibited item is inside a bag, travelers may have to leave the screening area while the bag is searched.
  • Up to 12 ounces of hand sanitizer can be carried onto a plane, but only 3.4 ounces of other liquids or gels.
  • TSA officers will wear face masks. Travelers are “encouraged” to do so, the TSA says.


Social distancing will be practiced while people stand in line for screenings. The TSA has already enacted other measures, such as requiring officers to change gloves after each pat-down. The TSA also encourages travelers to arrive in plenty of time for their flight because the new procedures may take longer.

The TSA is not requiring temperature screenings of passengers at checkpoints, despite calls from the Trump administration that such procedures be put in place. However, Frontier Airlines and Air Canada have announced plans to start screening their passengers with touchless thermometers.


Contributor: Ralph Ellis-WebMD

What Happens to Your Body When You Stop Eating Meat

What Happens to Your Body When You Stop Eating Meat

We’ve compiled a list of science-backed results that will happen to your body when you cut out meat and eat more plants.
Whether you like it or not, you can’t change the facts: Our country is about to face a serious meat shortage. Between meat processing plants shutting down and grocery stores limiting the amount of meat you can buy, there’s definitely a strain on an important facet of the food supply chain. Even Wendy’s is limiting the burgers they sell! However, while meat may be in short supply, did you ever think about what would happen to your body if you stop eating meat?

Every year, thousands of people decide to forgo meat and fish and find there are a lot of health benefits to it. And while it may seem like your diet will be lacking some serious protein, there are actually a lot of other protein alternatives you can turn to during a meat shortage. Plus, a lot of plant-based protein is great for your body! Not only are plant-based proteins great for your overall metabolism and digestion, but it can even protect you from disease.

So whether you find yourself facing a serious meat shortage at your grocery store, or are thinking about eliminating all meat from your diet in general, here are a few things your body when you stop eating meat—according to experts.

1 You’ll lose weight.
A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics prescribed a vegetarian diet; those who undertook it had an average weight loss of 7.5 lbs. If you build your meals from an array of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beans, weight loss can be easier than if you follow other regimens: A recent study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine found veganism to be superior to 11 other diets for weight loss.

2 You’ll lower your cholesterol.
Aside from weight loss, you’ll probably see a marked drop in your cholesterol. To a large extent, our genes determine our cholesterol level; however, exercise and your diet will also affect cholesterol levels. A meta-analysis published in the journal Nutrition Reviews found that plant-based vegetarian diets are associated with lower levels of total cholesterol, including lower levels of HDL and LDL cholesterol, compared to omnivorous diets.

3 You’ll have a cleaner gut.
The gut of a non-meat-eater will be cleaner than that of a person who digests meat on a daily basis, says Susan Tucker, holistic nutritionist and founder of Green Beat Life. Why? Most meat comes from animals that are given hormones and antibiotics. Then it’s treated with preservatives. (Under normal circumstances, meat starts to decompose very quickly.) “Vegans and vegetarians consume a high volume of fiber, phytonutrients and antioxidants, which keep the whole system cleaner,” she says.

The extra fiber and good bacteria in a vegetarian’s gut reduces inflammation, adds nutritionist Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, founder of Nutritious Life. She cites a 2014 study published in the journal Nutrition, in which researchers compared the gut health of vegetarians, vegans and omnivores. Vegetarians were found to have lower rates of improper insulin signaling, which results in metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Glassman says it’s theorized that lower inflammation enables an internal housecleaning: Fiber acts like a broom to sweep out pathogens in the gut. Chim Chim Cher-ee!

4 Your skin will glow.
Beauty may only be skin deep, but it reflects how happy our digestive situation is, says Tucker. She claims that plant eaters have a certain glow. “Many find that their acne, rosacea, or eczema clears up when they give up meat,” she says, adding that the antioxidants, fiber, and minerals in a plant-based diet help the system to detoxify daily, contributing to healthier skin.

5 There will be gas. You may find that the people applauding your lifestyle change are doing so from a safe distance. Suddenly increasing your fiber intake (via fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains) may cause you to experience gas and bloating. To offset this unwanted side effect, Glassman recommends that you ease into the diet, phasing out meat and steadily increasing foods that are especially high in fiber.

6 You’ll lower your risk of disease.
Assuming you swap meat with healthier alternatives — and not potato chips and ice cream — you’ll protect yourself from various heart diseases, cardio-metabolic risk factors, and some cancers. This was the conclusion of a 2014 study which looked at three groups of 7th Day Adventists, a Christian denomination whose members abstain from meat eating. According to Glassman, these improved health outcomes are, in part, another result of eating more fiber, which lowers cholesterol and increases satiety, causing people to eat fewer calories. The antioxidants that abound in fruits and vegetables protect against heart disease; she says. Other studies have shown that meat eaters also have increased risks of ailments such as appendicitis, chronic inflammation, and kidney disease.


Contributor: Grant Stoddard: Eat This, Not That!

How to Combat Weight Gain During the Pandemic (Beyond Diet and Exercise)

How to Combat Weight Gain During the Pandemic (Beyond Diet and Exercise)

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Quarantine life is challenging, to say the least, and all of us are struggling mentally, emotionally and physically. And no one would blame you for being tempted to abandon your diet and exercise plan and reach for the tub of ice cream while binge-watching that tiger show that everyone is talking about.

But health experts strongly recommend you do your best to prevent excess weight gain during this historic and scary time.

Dr. David Buchin, director of bariatric surgery at Huntington Hospital, is seeing that a large percentage of the patients battling Covid-19 in the medical center’s intensive care unit are obese. Patients who are obese are especially challenging to care for, he said, as treatment involves rolling them from their back to their front regularly to optimize lung function. In addition, a recent study found that in patients under the age of 60, obesity doubled the risk of Covid-19 hospitalization.

I’m not suggesting starting a strict diet or intense exercise program while sheltering in place, but there are some simple things you can do to prevent weight gain and protect yourself not only from Covid-19-related complications, but also from diseases such as diabetes and heart disease that will remain two of the top causes of death after we get through this pandemic.

Shop smart
When it comes to quarantine shopping, it’s important to be organized, especially when it comes to eating enough fruits and vegetables (aim for five servings per day if you can). Buy a combination of fresh, frozen and canned to last you at least a week or more.

Consume fresh products first and then move on to frozen and canned. Rinse canned vegetables to reduce sodium, and be sure to consume fresh or frozen fruit daily as the vitamin C content of canned fruits and vegetables, which is important for immunity health, is lower than fresh or frozen.

Chef Devin Alexander, who has maintained a 70-pound weight loss for decades, has some terrific tips for shopping on a budget and managing quarantine cravings. When buying produce, for example, unlike most other items, she suggested looking for the items on sale.

Watermelon and berries go on sale in the summer because they’re in season and thus very plentiful. That’s also when they taste the best, so you can make amazing desserts without the need for a ton of added sugar.

Alexander also recommended having coleslaw on hand for when the salty cravings hit. Her recipe for Orange Cilantro Cole Slaw, available on her website, satisfies that salty, crunchy hankering in a way that’s actually good for you. It helps get in a serving or two of vegetables, and just might keep you from “needing” to eat a bag of chips. In addition, cabbage and carrots are budget-friendly, last for weeks and are loaded with immune-supporting nutrients.

When you come home from the store, make sure to put the healthier foods in more easily seen locations in your kitchen. Food cravings and hunger can be triggered by just seeing food, so keep more indulgent foods out of sight — and hopefully out of mind — on upper shelves in your cupboard, in the back of the fridge or the bottom of the freezer.

Manage stress
During this global crisis it’s even more important than ever to find ways to conquer stress and manage anxiety. I know, it isn’t easy. Balancing homeschooling, financial challenges, cabin fever, social isolation and illness is stressful, but stress can contribute to poor eating choices and increase fat deep in your belly (underneath the muscle) that can contribute to heart disease and diabetes even more than the pinchable fat that lies directly underneath your skin.

Practice mindfulness, meaning doing your best trying to live in the present versus worrying too much about the future. That’s the advice from Joanne Koegl, a licensed marriage and family therapist who tells clients to take time out of their day to focus on simple things such as the warmth of the sun, the beauty of a flower, the taste of a bite of chocolate or the laugh of a child.

Koegl recommended apps and websites such as Headspace, Calm, The Tapping Solution (a self-administered therapy based on Chinese acupressure that can help calm the nervous system) and Breathe by anxiety expert Dr. Jud Brewer. These resources and others are offering free services focused on managing Covid-19-related anxiety and stress.

You can also practice basic self-care to manage anxiety and relieve stress. Take a hot bath, find a quiet place in your house and sip a cup of tea, exercise, call an old friend or consider volunteering if it’s safe. Helping others also gives you a sense of purpose and joy. If you are really struggling with anxiety, there are mental health telemedicine options such as Doctor on Demand and crisis hotlines available in major cities across the country. Don’t be afraid or embarrassed to reach out for professional help.

Sleep right
Both excess sleep and inadequate sleep have been linked to weight gain, increased appetite and worsening blood sugar control, so try your best not to completely abandon your sleep schedule by staying up late, sleeping until noon or staying up all night watching television.

Try to stay on a relatively normal sleep schedule, experts recommend. This is much easier to do if you follow basic sleep principles including avoiding excess alcohol before bed, keeping your room as dark as possible and at about 65 degrees Fahrenheit and exercising regularly. And turn off the news (and put down your phones) in the hours before bed.

Move more
Spending so much time at home has another unforeseen consequence. You are burning far fewer calories going about your daily life than you were pre-quarantine, regardless of whether you exercise daily.

Sitting at the computer for hours, whether doing Zoom work calls or socializing, and staying inside on evenings and weekends binge-watching television, along with shopping and socializing online, easily all add up to several hundred fewer calories burned per day through non-exercise activity, which is often higher than intentional exercise for most people. It’s essential to incorporate more movement and less sitting every day.

Buchin tells his patients to commit to a certain amount of exercise to “earn” their television viewing. For example, for each movie they watch they should incorporate 20 minutes of some form of activity which could be cleaning, playing with your family, gardening or even simply standing while talking on the phone or participating in a Zoom call.

I have been using my Apple Watch more than ever lately. I appreciate the reminder to stand up every hour for at least one minute and the ability to track my general daily activity in addition to exercise.

If you don’t have a fitness device, set a timer on your phone or even your microwave to remind you to get up every hour and walk around the house, up and down the stairs a few times or just do some stretching in place before sitting down again. As we hear repeatedly on the news, we are all in this together, and my hope is that with these tips, you and your loved ones can maintain your weight and stay fit, healthy and maybe even a little less stressed during this global pandemic.


Contributor: Dr. Melina Jampolis-CNN Health